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Philanthropic Achievement of the Week

1945 - Sloan-Kettering Institute

Sloan

General Motors vice president Charles Kettering is most famously known for his automotive inventions, such as the first electrical starter motor and leaded gasoline, and the 185 patents he held. Less known are his contributions to medicine and science. An extraordinarily broad tinkerer, Kettering also developed several medical innovations, such as an incubator for premature infants, treatments for venereal disease, and magnetic diagnostic devices.

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(VIDEO) Ryan: Civil society is one of the most important components of American life

House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan (R-WI), who is widely expected to take over as Chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, discussed several charity-related issues in this interview with CNBC last week. In this interview, Chairman Ryan expressed his belief in the critical role of our civil society, support for avoiding a cap of the charitable deduction, and extending the deadline to claim a charitable deduction until April 15.

The discussion was part of a broader conversation of the popular “Ice Bucket Challenge” for ALS. Chairman Ryan’s comments begin at 1:20.

 

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Philanthropic Achievement of the Week

1954 Columbus Discovers Modern Architecture

Columbus

Columbus, Indiana, a town of 44,000 people about an hour south of Indianapolis, is one of the world’s greatest troves of contemporary architecture. It is ranked by the American Institute of Architects as the sixth most architecturally innovative American city—behind only Chicago, New York, Washington, Boston, and San Francisco. The city is home to dozens of notable buildings, sculptures, and landmarks, including a public library by I. M. Pei; Eliel Saarinen’s First Christian Church; North Christian Church and Irwin Union Bank designed by Eliel’s son Eero; a downtown shopping center by Cesar Pelli; Harry Weese’s First Baptist Church; and a firehouse by Robert Venturi. Other architects and artists who have designed projects in Columbus include Henry Moore, Richard Meier, Kevin Roche, and Gunnar Birkets.

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ACR News 08.22.14—Ryan ‘No’ on Cap, Giving Increases in Puerto Rico

>> Federal: Washington Roundup
>> Federal: Rep. Ryan: No Cap for Charitable Deduction
>> Federal: Charitable Deduction Leads to a Sharp Increase of Donors in Puerto Rico
>> Federal: New Director for K-12 Programs
>> Top Reads: Proving Conventional Wisdom Wrong (Again) on Charitable Giving Tax Incentives


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(ACR BLOG) Rep. Ryan: No Top Cap for Charitable Deduction

House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan (R-WI), who is widely expected to take over as Chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, recently expressed his support for not implementing a cap on the charitable deduction, according to a report from Politico. Ryan stated that the charitable deduction is “the one area where I believe we should not have a top cap.”

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(ACR BLOG) Salt Lake Tribune Op-ed: Don’t let tax reform undermine charitable giving

Fraser Nelson, executive director of the Community Foundation of Utah, and Jeramy Lund, a Utah private investor, co-wrote an editorial in the Salt Lake Tribune  on August 16 urging Utahns to contact their elected officials this month while members of Congress are home. Lund and Nelson explain the importance of constituents letting elected officials know how the decisions they make will affect the nonprofit sector.

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Philanthropic Achievement of the Week

1999 Gates Millennium Scholars

Millenium Scholar

Just before the turn of the millennium, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation put into operation a major college scholarship program for minority students, with an initial grant of a cool billion dollars that was later increased to $1.6 billion. Every year, the Millennium Scholars program selects 1,000 new African-American, Hispanic, Asian, or Native American college prospects and offers them good-through-graduation scholarships (set at various levels to cover their need). These can be used at any college the student chooses. The program particularly aims to encourage minorities to enter scientific fields like computer science, math, public health, and engineering (where they are underrepresented), and any Millenium Scholar in good standing who finishes an undergraduate degree and wants to continue on to grad school in one of these technical fields will also have their graduate education paid for by Gates.

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Surprising White House Executive Action Critics: The Brother’s Keeper Philanthropy Controversy

By Howard Husock

It’s not often that President Obama faces criticism from the liberal left regarding his Administration’s policy initiatives in matters involving race and disadvantage. Which is what makes so notable an opinion piece in the latest Chronicle of Philanthropy criticizing My Brother’s Keeper, the President’s program, announced this past February, “to address persistent opportunity gaps faced by boys and young men of color.”  That focus was a cause of concern for NoVo Foundation executive director Pamela Shifman and former Schott Foundation program manager Nakisha Lewis, who wrote that Brother’s Keeper inappropriately overlooks the “dire straits” of many “minority women and girls”, including “epidemic levels of of domestic violence.”.  The article goes further in criticizing Brother’s Keeper for   “elevating a patriarchal conception of a “good” family—boys of color will grow up to be fathers and heads of households that are made up of nuclear families.”

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ACR Blog: Private Charitable Giving: A New Italian Tradition

Colosseum

Private charitable giving has played a significant role in the United States in preserving our country’s historical culture and landmarks. For example, David M. Rubenstein is one of many well-known philanthropists who share a passion for preserving American history. According to a recent Washington Post article, Rubenstein, who agreed to cover $7.5 million of the cost of restoration for the Washington Monument after the 2011 earthquake, has also made a donation of $12.35 million to restore Gen. Robert E. Lee’s home at Arlington National Cemetery. 

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Philanthropic Achievement of the Week

1882 Great Libraries From Enoch Pratt—and Others

Library
Enoch Pratt arrived in Baltimore from a Massachusetts farm with nothing but $150 in his pocket, but he was frugal and industrious and eventually thrived in a variety of businesses. In 1882 he offered to give the city of Baltimore a major circulating library for free public use, along with 32,000 books, plus four branch libraries in different quarters of the city, and an endowment of $1,058,333 for upkeep and future expansion. Once built, the Pratt almost immediately became one of the most heavily used libraries in the country, and it thrived over the century and a quarter since. Andrew Carnegie described it in The Gospel of Wealth as the best such institution in the country, and he cited Pratt as his exemplar for his own nationwide library program which he launched the year Pratt’s main library opened. In fact, two decades after the initial opening of the Pratt Library, Carnegie donated a half-million dollars to Baltimore to allow the building of 20 additional branches—part of his wider campaign that paid for the erection of more than 2,500 libraries (see the 1881 Carnegie Library entry in our companion list of major achievements in the arts and culture).

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